Protocol and Practice of Persons Appearing in the Court of Judge Ronee Korbin Steiner


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Specific Comments or Advice for Litigants

Specific Requirements or Preferences Restitution hearings: I generally set a status conference upon a request for restitution hearing. Upon learning the parties are ready, the Court will set a restitution hearing. The Court also requires a brief memorandum at least 2 days prior to the hearing outlining the request of the party.  
 
CCMC statements: The administrative order requires these be filed at least 2 days before the hearing. The Court requires the parties to jointly file and update the court.  
 
Motions to Continue: The Court requires Motions to Continue in writing. If the defense files one prior to a hearing, it should indicate that the defendant waives time if you desire for me to vacate a hearing instead of addressing the issue at the hearing.

Pre-Trial Practice and Management Issues

Motion Practice Please double space your motions. Please start or end your motion telling me exactly what you are requesting. Often times, the Court receives motions and while the Court wants to assist, the Court does not know what is being requested. In those cases, the Court is likely to deny the motions. This causes you unnecessary delay.  
 
If expedited treatment is requested the request should state what has already been done to attempt to expedite the matter (personal consultation with opposing counsel, email service on opposing party, etc.). It should also include a proposed form of order that provides a response date or deadline or some other provision for the other sides right to be heard. It is not the responsibility of court staff to coordinate an expedited response with the other side.  
 
Please make sure you deliver a copy of any motions/pleadings filed through e-file OR if you file them through the clerk, if you want me to see it soon. Sometimes it takes days for the Court to receive the document.  
 
The Court normally will not set oral argument unless it is requested. If it is requested, the Court will expect any additional information and probably not what has already been presented. This may be a time to explain arguments over which the Court needs clarity.

Trial Practice and Protocol

Trial Schedule The Court relies on the time the parties or attorneys estimate for trial.  
 
Parties will be accommodated with special needs.  
 
Our first hearing is usually at 8:30. Trials run 9 to noon and/or 1:30 to 4:30. I try hard to avoid that because it is an imposition on court staff.  
 
If your presentation will involve financial records or other data compilations, please ask for enough court time to walk through the key points during the hearing. If you want me to consider records, I will do so. However, summaries of exhibits are useful tools to educate the court, provided in addition to the voluminous records.
Jury Selection Please try and provide proposed voir dire in advance if at all possible. I know you are busy but it can help avoid delay and unneeded objections.  
 
I have no problem handling juror questions by phone.
Courtroom Etiquette Please be courteous to my staff. Remember that they can be helpful to you. But, please do not ask them legal advice. They are not lawyers and they cannot answer those questions.  
 
Please do not argue with the other party. Your comments are directed to the Court.  
 
You may stand or sit at counsel table or use the podium, as you prefer. You may not question the witness while standing next to the witness or directly in front of the witness stand without permission.  
 
Please remind those people who come with you to court that they are also expected to be courteous and abide by Courtroom procedures.  
 
Please direct your clients to be on time, to spit out gum and to be courteous to court staff.
Other Courtroom Policies and Recommendations It is OK to call and ask about something that is pending, if you have waited for a reasonable amount of time but have not heard from us. Keep in mind, however, that we often have to allow time to pass before we act, to give the opposing party a chance to respond or for a variety of other reasons. My staff works very hard. Please be courteous to them.