Juvenile Probation

Juvenile Justice Definitions
Community Justice Committee (CJC) Some juveniles meet with a Community Justice Committee (CJC), a group of three citizens from their neighborhood, who assign them consequences for their illegal activity, if they accept responsibility for that activity. Compliance Juveniles who complete the diversion consequences have no further obligation - their case is closed, and no charges can be filed. Consequences All juveniles assigned to Diversion are given a consequence, which may be: unpaid community service work, paying a fine or restitution, counseling, attending an education program that aims to prevent drug or alcohol use or additional delinquent acts. Diversion Complaints for less serious offenses - like shoplifting or truancy - are sent to Diversion. The juvenile is given the chance to satisfy his/her obligation to the state (and sometimes the victim) without going to court. Diversion can be completed in several ways. Diversion Program Some juveniles can be enrolled in a Diversion Program like Teen Court or CUTS, depending on the offense and where they live. To participate, they must acknowledge responsibility for the delinquent or incorrigible act, and have their parents' approval. return to top

Limited Jurisdiction Hearings Some juveniles are cited to City Courts or Justices of the Peace (depending on where they live and their offense). They must appear in court and comply with the consequences given by the judge. Non-Compliance If the juvenile doesn't complete the consequence, the matter is referred to the County Attorney who can file charges in Juvenile Court, which would result in the juvenile appearing before a Juvenile Court judge. Probation Officer A probation officer has a personal interview with the juvenile and a parent. If the juvenile acknowledges responsibility for the delinquent or incorrigible act, the probation officer shall require that the juvenile comply with one or more conditions. Advisory Hearing The first hearing in Juvenile Court. The juvenile is advised of his/her legal rights and the charges that the County Attorney is accusing him/her of. Adjudication Hearing Hearing at which the juvenile is found guilty or not guilty. Sometimes this hearing is combined with the Advisory. In adult criminal court it's called a trial. Apprehension/Complaint A juvenile is apprehended by a police officer, is charged with a specific illegal offense, and a Complaint charging that offense is sent to the Juvenile Probation Department. return to top

Commit ADJC Juveniles who have not been successful on probation or appear to be risks to the safety of the community can be sent to this agency run by the state of Arizona. They begin with a certain amount of time in a locked facility, and if successful there, are paroled, and allowed to live in the community again. Compliance Juveniles who pay their fines or restitution and/or do what they're supposed to do while on probation, are released from probation and have no further relationship with the Juvenile Court. County Attorney The County Attorney's office reviews all complaints that allege a felony and decides whether there is enough evidence to file charges. Dismiss If the juvenile is found not delinquent or not incorrigible (that is - not guilty) of all the charges on the petition, the case is dismissed, and no further action is taken. The case is over. Disposition Hearing If the juvenile is found delinquent or incorrigible (that is - guilty) of any of the charges on the petition, he/she must have a disposition hearing, at which the judge decides what to do about the juvenile's illegal acts.return to top

Fine/Restitution The juvenile must pay a fine or pay a victim for the harm he/she has caused. Sometimes these are a part of being placed in probation. Juvenile Intensive Probation Services (JIPS) This is a stricter form of probation, requiring more contact with a probation officer and usually added terms of probation. Juvenile Petition Official written document filed by County Attorney that lists one or more offenses that a juvenile is believed to have committed. Juvenile Probation Department The complaint, name of the juvenile, and other information are recorded in the Juvenile Probation Department's computer. Probation The juvenile must have regular contact with a probation officer and comply with terms of probation or face the possibility of returning to court. return to top

Transfer Hearing Hearing at which the Juvenile Court judge decides whether or not to send the juvenile to adult criminal court. Transfer Request If the offense is very serious the County Attorney can ask the juvenile judge to transfer the juvenile - that is, that he/she go to Adult criminal court for trial. Arraignment The first hearing in Adult Court. The juvenile is advised of his/her rights and the charges filed against him/her. The court also decides whether to keep the juvenile in jail or allow him/her to be bailed out of jail. Adult Sentencing The court decides what to do about the juvenile who has been found guilty. In adult criminal court this also means the juvenile loses many of his civil rights and the record of his guilt generally remains on his record. Adult Trial The hearing at which the juvenile is found guilty or not guilty. Discretionary Direct File As Adult Arizona laws says that if a juvenile is charged with a certain serious crimes, and is at least 14 years old he MAY be prosecuted as an adult, and can even be sent to an adult prison. The County Attorney decides whether to file charges in Juvenile or Adult Criminal Court. return to top

Guilty If the juvenile is found guilty, he/she must return to court for a sentencing hearing Jail The juvenile is required to spend some time in jail (up to a year) before being released to the community. After release from jail he/she is usually kept on probation. Mandatory Direct File As Adult Arizona laws says that if a juvenile is charged with a very serious crime, and is at least 15 years old he MUST be prosecuted as an adult, and can even be sent to an adult prison. Not Guilty If the juvenile is found not guilty of all charges, the case is dismissed, and no further action is taken. The case is over. Prison The juvenile is sent to an adult prison. Probation This is one possible sentencing result - the juvenile is allowed to live in the community, but he must report regularly to a probation officer and obey certain terms of probation that often limit his freedom. Often a probationer will have to spend some time in jail before beginning his probation. return to top

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